History of Andaman Islands

Across the Bay of Bengal lie the 572 islands that form the Andaman Islands. Only 38 islands are inhabited and much of the coastline is a declared marine reserve. The enveloping atmosphere with its subtle harmonies of light and shade, fragrance and exhales the paradise, visionary splendors, and the music of the birds that defies definition would develop creative and constructive feelings in the hearts of those people who come here to enjoy the beauty of nature.

The Andaman & Nicobar Islands are a group of big and small, inhabited and uninhabited islands lying in the South Eastern Part of the Bay of Bengal. They lie 800 kms north to south along an arch in long and narrow broken chain. The beauty of these islands, create in men a love of nature with a caressing tenderness, a wistful fondness for all its delicate nuances. With coral reefs and white beaches, the unpolluted paradise is treasure for divers and snorkelers. Itís a dream destination for beach lovers. The island is rich in flora and fauna.

In 1789, the British established their colony in Andaman and Nicobar Islands. But, the island was abandoned the British in 1796; yet, the British resumed control over the island in the 19th century. During the 19th century as the Andaman and Nicobar Islands history maintains, the British used Andaman and Nicobar as a penal colony, which was named 'Kalapani' or the Cellular Jail. The history of Andaman and Nicobar Islands proves that criminals convicted of crime against the East India Company was sent to Andaman and Nicobar Islands, with a life sentence: the convicts were forced to live in exile in the Kalapani.

But, with the end of the British rule, i. e. after the Indian Independence, the 'Kalapani' gave way to a conglomeration of beautiful islands. It was in 1947 that Andaman and Nicobar Islands formed a part of the India Union. Today, Andaman and Nicobar Islands is among the seven union territories of India.